Netflix to Reach 700 Original Series in 2018, Lessons from Spotify and More

One: Netflix Eyeing Total of About 700 Original Series in 2018

"Netflix, set to spend upwards of $8 billion on content in 2018, will have in the neighborhood of 700 original TV shows on the service worldwide this year, according to CFO David Wells.

"The huge bucket of content is driving up Netflix’s subscriber base, said Wells, speaking Tuesday at the Morgan Stanley Technology, Media & Telecom Conference. The “700-range” figure he cited includes 80 non-English-language original productions from outside the U.S., such as psychological thriller “Dark” from Germany and “Club de Cuervos” from Mexico. The total encompasses both new and existing original series (such as “Orange Is the New Black” and “Narcos”)."

Todd Spangler, Variety


Two: Lessons from Spotify

"The two dominant business models for venture-backed startups are advertising for consumer-focused companies, and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) for business-focused ones. On one level, these business models are quite different: the former gives away software for free with the hope of convincing a third party to pay for access to users; the latter charges some portion of users directly. The underlying economics of both, though, are more similar than you might think — indeed, both are very much in line with venture-backed startups of the past."

Ben Thompson, Stratechery


Three: WatchKit is a sweet solution that will only ever give us baby apps

"In the original 2007 iPhone introduction, Steve Jobs famously derided other smartphones at the time for running “baby” software and the “baby” internet. He was right.

"Developers weren’t given access to make native apps until the iPhone’s second year. Before the native development kit was ready, Apple tried to pass off web apps as a “sweet solution” for third-party apps, but nobody was fooled."

Maro Arment,


Four: Defending your app from copies and clones

"App developers sometimes ask me what they should do when their features, designs, or entire apps are copied by competitors."

Maro Arment,


Five: Inside Google’s plan to make the whole web as fast as AMP

"In a blog post today, Google is announcing that it’s formally embarking on a project to convince the group in charge of web standards to adopt technology inspired by its Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) framework. In theory, it would mean that virtually any webpage could gain the same benefits as AMP: near-instantaneous loading, distribution on multiple platforms, and (critically) more prominent placement on Google properties."

Dieter Bohn, The Verge